<![CDATA[ORANGE EASEL - Orange Easel Blog]]>Fri, 19 Apr 2019 16:28:34 -0500Weebly<![CDATA[Marbling Easter Eggs with Nail Polish]]>Tue, 09 Apr 2019 14:00:00 GMThttp://orangeeaselart.com/orange-easel-blog/marbling-easter-eggs-with-nail-polishYou've seen the videos on facebook for this one right?  They make it look so easy!   So I thought I'd pick up some nail polish and some eggs and give it a try.  You know, ON A WHIM for this week's facebook live broadcast.   

My whim turned into pretty much my whole afternoon.

Let me tell you, the results are stunning... 
It's not as easy as it looks! What we learned when we tried to marble Easter eggs with nail polish and how we got these stunning results!
...but the learning curve was LOOOOONG!

After much trial-and-error.  And a little googling.  I figured out a way that worked best for me.  And I'm sharing it with you here:
The nail polish that I used was on sale at Walgreens (2 for $5).  It's the cheapest I could find and to do my dozen eggs, I probably used less than half a bottle of each color.  I mentioned in the video that I had used real eggs.  I tried the dye-able plastic ones, but those little buggers float. So I ended up with it bobbing all around the surface of the water (picture a ping pong ball) while I struggled to grip it properly in order to submerge it into the marbled paint.  After expressing my frustration in the video, one of the really smart parents at our studio shared how she managed to give those plastic-floaty-eggs a handle:
"We always use plastic eggs. I poke a hole at the top with a push pin and then insert a toothpick. That way the kids can dip them in the polish and not get as much on their hands. When they are finished, they take the other side of the toothpick and push it down into a piece of recycled Styrofoam of flower foam."
Seriously, smart people hang out at the art studio.  (Thanks, Marianne for this tip!)
It's not as easy as it looks! What we learned when we tried to marble eggs with nail polish and how we got these stunning results!
It's not as easy as it looks! What we learned when we tried to marble eggs with nail polish and how we got these stunning results!
I hope you try this out at home if you're looking for a unique way to dye some eggs with a pre-teen or teen (or adult) crowd.  Watch the video above.  And be patient.  As you can see here by looking at my eleven eggs (I dropped one), my last three eggs are significantly better than my first eight!  Gimme another dozen and they'll be even better!
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It's not as easy as it looks! What we learned when we tried to marble eggs with nail polish and how we got these stunning results!
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<![CDATA[March Madness and Kids Art Classes]]>Fri, 29 Mar 2019 05:00:00 GMThttp://orangeeaselart.com/orange-easel-blog/march-madness-and-kids-art-classes
It's March Madness and basketball seems to be everywhere I look.  My kids just finished their basketball seasons a couple weeks ago, and I'm feeling a little lost without my full weekend of games.  We're finally to the point where their basketball games look like REAL basketball games. 

(If you have really young kids who are still playing bitty sports and everything looks like a herd of cats chasing a ball, hang in there.  One day, you'll look up and think, oh my gosh, it looks like the REAL thing!  And then it gets fun.)

So, watching these athletes, teammates, and ballplayers grow-up has me thinking a lot about our Orange Easel art classes. 

​I hope you can hang with me here because I feel like there's some misconceptions about kids art classes.  And I think we need to be looking at them more like a youth basketball season.  

Let's compare...

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On a youth basketball team, some kids are there because they love the game and can't get enough of it.  Some are there because they are really good at it.  Some are there because all their friends are on the team.  Some are looking for a place to fit in.  Some aren't sure why they're even playing but they are hoping something clicks.   

When we sign our kids up for a season of basketball, we're looking for an EXPERIENCE.  Yeah, we'd definitely like to see some growth...maybe in better dribbling skills, higher game IQ, better teamwork or just increased confidence.  We judge the success of the season NOT on the end-of-the-season tournament, but rather by looking at how the entire experience positively impacts the development of our children.  

Our weekly art classes are an experience that encourages the same kind of growth as that baseball season (or baseball season or soccer season).  We're looking for increased skills--in drawing, painting, printing, sculpture, etc.  We're working on a better understanding of abstract concepts like composition and balance.  We improving on our vocabulary and our critique skills so we can support our classmates.  We're creating together and making connections with fellow makers.  We building self-confidence and resiliency.

Just like the basketball team, our kids are come to the studio for ALL different reasons.  Some have a natural talent that they are looking to grow.  Some have a LOVE for creating and are just looking for an outlet.  Some love the freedom of the studio environment.  Some have friends in class.  Others are looking for friends.



Our jobs as parents and coaches

Our instructors' job is to help each one of our students get what THEY need out of class.  For most our our students, that still involves making an amazing piece of art.   But, we also understand that not everyone NEEDS to finish their final project.  Some have zero interest in finishing their artwork because that's not what THEY are looking to get out of the class. They may never truly finish anything in our eyes, but if they are getting what THEY need out of their studio session each week, that's what matters.  

So, parents--especially Orange Easel parents--please look at the season, not the score.  Look at the practices, the teamwork, the connection, and the experience.  Not just the finished artwork that they walk out with at the end of the month.  Because for some of students, what they are working on isn't as tangible as something that can be painted on a canvas.  And for ALL of our students, that's not the full story.

Anyone who knows me well, know that I'm as competitive as they come.  I like to win.  And I like pretty art.  But--at this age, at this level and in the big picture--the "score" in so unimportant.  What we learn along the way is what matters.     ​​
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<![CDATA[The Value of Repeating an Art Lesson]]>Wed, 20 Mar 2019 01:53:00 GMThttp://orangeeaselart.com/orange-easel-blog/the-value-of-repeating-an-art-lesson
My 10 year old daughter takes classes on Thursday night. This is her third year doing our Pet Portraits class in February. And every year she has chosen to paint a picture of one of our Great Danes. This year is a painting of Sophia, my 7-year-old blue merle. 


Why we offer the "same" class

We repeat a lot of our curriculum year after year and I hear some parents express concern that their kiddos have "already taken that class."

Couple points to keep in mind:
  1. Our kids don't mind. Most of them welcome the chance to do something familiar. To tackle the challenge again. And to do better.
  2. We only get better with practice so a repeated lesson doesn't hurt. It's been a whole year...lots of growth happens in 365 days.
  3. Most importantly, our artists decide their own compositions so it's never the same artwork, even if it's the same challenge.

    For example: My daughter painted our other Great Dane (Titan) last year as a portrait. The year before that, she painted Titan again, but it was his profile (side view). This year, she wanted a challenge so she chose to paint a three-quarter view portrait of Sophie with her mouth open. Each painting is different even those technically it's the same Pet Portraits Class.
Here are a few more portraits from our Thursday night class.   

You know what's impressive? These 10 and 11 year olds had to DRAW their pet on their canvas first before starting their painting. They worked from photographs to design an interesting composition, get the scale right, and render their pet accurately. There's no paint-by-number here...they started with a blank canvas and a pencil!
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<![CDATA[We could make prettier art...]]>Wed, 20 Mar 2019 01:24:01 GMThttp://orangeeaselart.com/orange-easel-blog/we-could-make-prettier-art
​We could make "prettier" art.

Our instructors could design out an already-balanced composition, pick out the colors that we know go best together, and outline each step exactly for our our artists to follow.

And the art might look prettier.

But our objective is NOT to see how well they can execute the teacher's instruction.
Instead: 
  • We learned about different typography and practiced writing our name as many different ways as we can.
  • We looked at the paintings from abstract expressionism and discuss how color and brush stroke conveys emotions.
  • We had to mix our own secondary and tertiary colors, and tints and shades.
  • We talked about the importance of balance and contrast and completeness.
  • We brainstormed individually. We discussed as a group. We painted. We critiqued. We problem-solved.
  • Sometimes, we re-painted.

And in the end, THIS IS ALL THEM.

Could I make it prettier? Probably.

Could I make it better? I don't think so.
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<![CDATA[How to Make Colorful Bubble Prints with Kids]]>Sat, 09 Mar 2019 23:48:36 GMThttp://orangeeaselart.com/orange-easel-blog/how-to-make-colorful-bubble-prints-with-kidsThis post contains affiliate links.
Colorful Bubble Art Activity for Kids - Orange Easel School of Art
How do you capture the essence of a bubble?  They are so sheer and airy and delicate.  Plus the reflect all the beautiful colors in the environment around them.  We've got the perfect printing activity to capture those bubbles on paper!

This activity is wet and messy, but since the mess is actually just soapy water, it's perfect for home!

SUPPLIES:
Colorful Bubble Art Activity for Kids. The first step to our glittery, Rainbow Fish art project!
The result from these bubble prints is a delicate lacy pattern (see above).  The fish print was done in a second step using printing foam; we'll get a blog post written about that step next week!
Colorful Bubble Art Activity for Kids
The best part is seeing how BIG you can get your bubbles to grow!
Colorful Bubble Art Activity for Kids
It's a little bit science, a little bit art (and a little bit of soapy-mess)...and a whole lot of fun!
Colorful Bubble Art Activity for Kids

Video Tutorial

If you want to make these bubble prints at home, we've put together a short tutorial for you that appeared first on our facebook page.  
After your bubble prints dry, you can cut  or tear them to use them in collages or use them as backgrounds for more drawings, paintings, and prints.  In our next post, we'll show you how we made our glittery fishy prints to go along with the story, Rainbow Fish.  Stay tuned!
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More Bubble Activities:

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<![CDATA[Unique Mixed Media Self Portrait Art Lesson]]>Sun, 24 Feb 2019 19:19:36 GMThttp://orangeeaselart.com/orange-easel-blog/unique-mixed-media-self-portrait-art-lesson
This is one of my favorite projects that we've done during our mixed media month! Admittedly, I'm a sucker for a good self portrait project, especially one that allows our teens and pre-teens to do some reflecting on what makes them unique AND avoids the anxiety that comes from telling them they are going the have to draw their own face.

This project incorporates the art form of a selfie and photo filters instead of drawing and painting, so it's perfect for our older artists who are already super familiar with the technology!

Step One: Prepping the photos

Most of our kids either took the photos themselves OR had a friend do it.  They took as many as they wanted until they were happy with one.  We encourage showing some personality and experimenting with different camera  unique angles.

​Once the photo were done, we imported them into PicsArt to edit them.  We took that saturation to zero and then applied two filters.  First a posterizing filter that simplified the lines and number of grey scale values.   And then a halftone dots filter that increased the contrast and gave our photos a pop art feeling reminiscent of Lichtenstein. 

We made sure that the photos had plenty of negative space--because that's where our collage will show through!
We've learned that our inkjet office printer doesn't print on transparencies well--they are wet and smudge really easily--so we always have them printed at Office Depot.  

Step 2: Create the collage

Now comes the fun part!  

We searched magazines, newspapers, scrapbook paper, and even wall paper for the perfect background.   To avoid over-thinking this step, we give each artist a envelope (a piece of construction paper folded in half and taped on the sides...real fancy) and tell them to simply collect things that they like.  

They are looking for textures, symbols, words, photographs, and color fields that they feel represent them.  It's like a treasure hunt! 

In a class setting this is really fun.  Almost like a get-to-know-you exercise.  Our classes employ a team mentality if one student is looking for a particular image or word, everyone will keep an eye out for it while they are completing their own search.
Once they've got a good collection going, they can start laying the pieces out on their canvas.  Here's where it's a good idea to have your photo transparency handy.   We tell our artists to make sure that their favorite collage pieces lay underneath the negative space on the transparency.  

Step 3: Assembling and finishing

At this point, the whole artwork comes together very quickly.  We use modpodge to glue all the layers together.

We set out acrylic paints and printing tools (our favorite is bubble wrap) for additional layering.  The paint gives even more texture  and can help "soften" some of busyness of the collage and simplify the background behind important parts of the photograph.  

The finishing touch is embellishing the top of the photograph SPARINGLY.  We usually have washi tape, faux flowers, and more paint.

If you need a great self portrait project, or a unique mixed media project, I encourage you to give this one a try!​

Unique Self Portrait Art Projects

Ideas from other brilliant teaches and students:

Linoleum Block Prints
Watercolor Portraits
Holley Portraits
Color Scheme Portraits
Erase Your Face
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<![CDATA[Paper Doll Art with Preschoolers]]>Fri, 15 Feb 2019 21:33:05 GMThttp://orangeeaselart.com/orange-easel-blog/paper-doll-art-with-preschoolersThe post may contain affiliate links.
We've been studying portraiture and figure in our preschool art classes throughout the month of February.  One of the most successful art activities we all shared together this week was an invitation to make paper dolls. 

We judge the success of an art activity in our studio, not by the art it produces but rather the level engagement that we had from our students and the dialogue we were able to have during (and even after) the creative process.

We never really know how long a classes is going to be engaged in the materials we set out. This one keep our artists busy working and chatting for a full 35 minutes!

Once they were done, we stapled them to cardboard tubes so they could stand up.
Since this was a process art invitation, there's very little work on our part.  All we had to do was set out the supplies and facilitate the dialogue!

SUPPLIES:
Before class started, we traced a template and cut our paper dolls from heavy white paper (get our template here).  If you're not up for cutting out your own, or if you REALLY need a lot of them, you can always purchase a pre-cut pad of blank doll figures (check out these ones).

Other supplies that you could use: washi tape, googly eyes, yarn, ribbon, fabric scraps, etc.
Our kiddos pretty much dove right in with very little hesitation or need for direction.  But our students visit the studio weekly and are used to these types of process art invitations (In other words, they've learned not to ask, "what are we supposed to do?" because they know they are just going to get a smile and a shrug from their instructors!) 

If your students are having a hard time getting started, here are some conversation starters:
  • What is he/she missing?  (hair, facial features, clothes, etc)
  • What is YOUR favorite color pants to wear?
  • Do you think you'll use a marker or paper to make those shoes?
  • Is that paper the right size for a shirt?  
  • Do you think you'll cut it or tear it to make it smaller?
Try not to let them get hung up on the perfect shape of a shirt or the perfect shape of a shoe.  Rectangles make great shoes.  Torn bits of paper layered together will be a wonderfully unique shirt.  

Do you see the doll on the left with the big smile and pointy teeth?  He's dressed in a dinosaur costume.  The mask is folds down to reveal the human face underneath. How amazing is that?!
I hope you try this out with your artists at home or in your classroom.  Let me know how it goes for you!

More Figure & Portraiture Art Activities 

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<![CDATA[Top 10 Famous Artists to Teach Preschoolers]]>Tue, 12 Feb 2019 15:00:00 GMThttp://orangeeaselart.com/orange-easel-blog/top-10-famous-artists-to-teach-preschoolers
Teaching Art History to Preschoolers can be engaging and full of process art invitations. We've compiled a list of OUR favorite famous artists, why we love each one, and collection of art activity links to help you if you're planning an art history curriculum in your classroom. So, who made the list? It might surprise you...
Teaching art history to preschoolers is one of my favorite things!  As well as coming up with art activities that support our art history lesson.  We've compiled a list of OUR favorite famous artists, why we love each one, and collection of art activity links to help you if you're planning an art history curriculum in your classroom.

So, who made the list? Here you go:
  • KANDINSKY
  • MONDRIAN
  • MATISSE
  • VAN GOGH
  • SEURAT
  • MONET
  • WARHOL
  • KLIMT
  • POLLOCK
  • O'KEEFE

Yes, I'm aware that Picasso isn't on there.  Sorry, Pablo.  I still love your quote.

Art History Matters

Our preschool classes have a monthly Art History focus that goes along with the art concept that we're learning and the stories that we're reading.  When we're studying CONTRAST (the difference between black and white, shadow and highlight)d in January, we look at VanGogh's Starry Night and we read the books Flashlight and Where the Wild Things Are.  We don't look at VanGogh's Sunflowers because they don't fit into our curriculum.  Don't feel like you have to teach the entire breadth of an artists' work or the entire art movement; it's okay to simplify it.   

It's also important to note that our lessons and our activities that follow are PROCESS ART.  It's never about the product that is created, but rather the learning that took place in the process.  When we're learning about Seurat and then offer an invitation to try pointillism by making fingerprints on giant stamp pads, it's perfectly acceptable for our artists to make handprints instead.  Or even foot prints.  Our art invitations are just that--invitations.  It doesn't mean that the lesson was a failure or that they don't understand Seurat's art. Maybe our artists just really, really needed to feel their whole hand on that stamp pad.   

Our Top 10 Favorite Famous Artists to Teach Kids

Teaching Art History to Preschoolers can be engaging and full of process art invitations. Check out our favorite art activities inspired by Wassily Kandinsky.

Wassily Kandinsky

First of all, Wassily is just a fun name and all the preschoolers love it.  In the studio, our lessons focus on Kandinsky's concentric (that's a great vocabulary word!) circle art because it's a shape that most of our students can identify and replicate!  We are inspired by this artwork to draw, paint, collage, and print.
KANDINSKY INSPIRED ART ACTIVITIES:
Teaching Art History to Preschoolers can be engaging and full of process art invitations. Check out our favorite art activities inspired by Piet Mondrian.

Piet Mondrian

Similar to Kandinsky's circles, Mondrian's lines are perfectly tailored for preschool curriculum.  And check out the squares and rectangles that his lines create!  Mondrian's artwork is also a wonderful lead-in to a lesson in primary colors and the secondary colors that they can create if they cross Mondrian's lines.
MONDRIAN INSPIRED ART ACTIVITIES
Teaching Art History to Preschoolers can be engaging and full of process art invitations. Check out our favorite art activities inspired by Henri Matisse

Henri Matisse

Studying Matisse gives us a reason to break out the scissors and the glue.  We focus on teaching pattern (repetition of shapes throughout a space) and collage.  Matisse called his later cut paper work "painting with scissors."
MATISSE INSPIRED ART ACTIVITIES
Teaching Art History to Preschoolers can be engaging and full of process art invitations. Check out our favorite art activities inspired by Expressionism and VanGogh.

Vincent VanGogh

When we study Van Gogh with our students, we really mean that we're studying the most well-known Van Gogh painting...Starry Night.  We look at the texture, colors, and movement .  We also notice that the way Van Gogh made stars is different we would normally make them!
VANGOGH INSPIRED ART ACTIVITIES
Teaching Art History to Preschoolers can be engaging and full of process art invitations. Check out our favorite art activities inspired by George Seurat and Pointillism

George Seurat

Hooray for pointillism!  We love making lots of little dots.  Q-tips make wonderful pointillism-makers.  You can even bind a bunch of them with a rubber band for more efficient dot making.  Finger prints are another favorite invitation when we're learning about Seurat.
SEURAT INSPIRED ART ACTIVITIES
Teaching Art History to Preschoolers can be engaging and full of process art invitations. Check out our favorite art activities inspired by Impressionism and Monet.

Claude Monet

We study Monet in April when it's just beginning to feel like spring in Missouri.  It's perfect because his water lily paintings make us want to make ALL the nature art.  The Impressionist style is perfect for preschoolers to try to imitate!
MONET I​NSPIRED ART ACTIVITIES
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Andy Warhol

Our Orange Easel students study Andy Warhol during our printmaking unit.  We practice being "like a machine" and mass producing art using different printing and stamping techniques.   If you have tried out printing foam, I highly recommend it!
WARHOL I​NSPIRED ART ACTIVITIES
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Gustav Klimt

Sigh.  We study Klimt so we can use All. The. Gold.   Seriously.  Gold foil.  Gold paint.  Gold markers.  We look at two paintings (The Kiss and Tree of Life).  There are so many wonderful shapes patterns happening in these works that are easily imitated by our young artists.  
KLIMT INSPIRED ART ACTIVITIES
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Jackson Pollock

If you're going to do art history with kids, you have to do Pollock.  It's such a unique way of producing art.  Put the paper on the floor and spend an hour dripping and drizzling paint ALL OVER IT.    I promise they'll remember that lesson.
POLLOCK INSPIRED ART ACTIVITIES
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Georgia O'Keefe

When we look at the art of Georgia O'Keefe, we talk about perspective (like we're an itty -bitty ant on a flower nearby) and we talk about color (how many different reds can you find?)
O'KEEFE INSPIRED ART ACTIVITIES

Additional Preschool Resources

We hope that our Top 10 gets you thinking about YOUR Top 10 list.  And inspires you to incorporate some art history into you ABCs, colors, and shapes lesson.  There are so many tie-ins between famous artists and famous paintings that you can use in the preschool classroom.  Happy teaching!
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Inside the Preschool Classroom : Exploring Art Concepts of Shadows and Highlights (contrast)
Inside the Preschool Art Room : Portraiture and Figure Study by using magazines as your canvas (and whatever else you have lying around)
How to encourage more drawing (longer drawing) from toddlers and preschoolers through the use of sound games.
Watercolor Hand Prints are a fresh take on an old favorite. Plus, they are more acceptable to our artists with sensory issues (because it just feels wet...not messy)
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<![CDATA[Painting Live - Valentine Hearts]]>Fri, 08 Feb 2019 06:00:00 GMThttp://orangeeaselart.com/orange-easel-blog/painting-live-valentine-heartsI thought it would be fun to go live on facebook and share some watercolor painting with you today!   


I'm going to be painting with three different types of watercolor-ish paints (okay, the last one is technically an acrylic ink, but it's my favorite!).  I hope you enjoy this little heart tutorial!​
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<![CDATA[How to Advocate for PROCESS Art]]>Mon, 28 Jan 2019 13:00:00 GMThttp://orangeeaselart.com/orange-easel-blog/how-to-advocate-for-process-art
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
We are a PROCESS art studio.  Which means, at all ages, OUR focus is on the learning that takes place through the manipulation of art supplies and art concepts, rather than the resulting project.  

I'd like to talk for a minute to my fellow preschool teachers.  (Teachers of grade school and older, I'll get you another post here soon). 

​Now, preschool teachers (and by teachers, I mean superheros), I know you value the process.  I know you see the magic in the mess and the beauty in a smudgy brownish blog of painted paper.    

But how do you explain it to parents?  When they are headed out the door at the end of the day with art that isn't quite refridgerator worthy, how do you explain what you did all day?  How to you fight the pressure to produce pinterest-worthy projects for our students to take home from art class?  

I put together some of my best tips from the past 10 years of experience:

Process Art is not about us.  It's about them.

Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
TIP #1: Set the expections up front
At the beginning on the year, send home a flyer about the types of activities you'll be doing in your room and WHY.  If you need a template to get you started, I've got you.  Click here to download a one-page document that you can personalize for your class.
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
TIP #2: Take pictures 
Capturing the actual creation will help parents to visualize what exactly happened.  Video is even better.   See how focused they are?  See how they are smiling?​
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
TIP #3: Stop sending the art home
Stop worrying about HAVING something to send home.  It's okay if they don't take something home.  If the process is what really matters, the product created isn't needed as proof.  Don't feel like you need to keep everything.  Often times in our art centers, those small quarter sheets of paper get used and left there, with no name or way of knowing who it belongs to.  We usually pile them all up and save them until the end of the day JUST IN CASE someone comes back for it.  If not, it get's thrown away.  If the kids don't care, why should you?
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
TIP #4: Make collaborative art instead
Giant collaborative art is wonderful for the classroom because it's easier to prepare, uses fewer resources, and encourages communication skills between students.  Plus, when the art stays in the classroom,  it can be revisited over and over (and none of the parents have to figure out what to do with the day's art.)
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
Process Art for Preschoolers - Our best tips on how to incorporate it and how to explain it to parents
TIP #5: Document what the children say about their art
Write a note quoting the child's explanation of their art.  Drawing for preschoolers is more about communication than it is about making something pretty.   This way parents can continue the conversation at home.​ 
I hope that those tips are helpful.  What's your best tip for advocating for more PROCESS ART in the preschool classroom?  I'd love to know!
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More Process Art for Preschoolers

Inside the Preschool Art Room - Creepy spider drawing and painting lesson for the the preschool classroom
Inside the Preschool Art Room - Learning Contrast by Exploring Shadows and Highlights
From the Art Studio - Process Art Activity for Kids of all ages - Hot Crayon Rocks
How to use shaving cream and washable watercolors to marble paper
Squishy, paint-filled sponges are the best exercise for those little finger muscles. Check out this process art activity for your preschool train lovers!
Draw caterpillars using rich, buttery sumi ink.
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